Modern Classic SLRs Series :
Nikon F & F2 Shared Resources:
Specialized Flashes - Ring Flash

 

Ring Flash.jpg (16k)


SM-1 Ringlight

As with all ringlights, this unit is designed to provide shadowless lighting for close-up subjects. It attaches to the rear of the lens via the bayonet mount (it has a bayonet release lever similar to that on the M2-tube as well as a semi-automatic diaphragm plunger). It is designed for photography at mag. ratios greater than 1:1 with 24mm to 135mm lenses, reversed on bellows (via the BR-2). The permanently attached cord has two plugs, a PC-type sync and a 4-pin power plug, which attaches to the SB-1. There is a switch on the SM-1 to cut output from full to 1/4 power, but overall power is controlled from the SB-1. It has a small modeling light built-in for ease of focussing when up close to the subject.

Different lenses have different exposure effects with the SM-1. If I had some skill with cgi, I'd write a script to automatically look up the f/ stop based on your subject-to-film-plane distance. Unfortunately, you have to settle for the following tables:

 

subject-fp f/distance

stop

for 24 f/2.8:

305 mm

5.6

 

250 mm

8

 

200 mm

11

for 35f/2.8, f/2, f/1.4 and 28f/3.5, f/2:

360 mm

5.6

 

305 mm

8

 

205 mm

11

 

195 mm

16

for 55f/3.5 and 50 f/2, f/1.4 and 45 f/2.8:

310 mm

11

 

240 mm

16

 

205 mm

22

for 105 f/2.5 and 85 f/1.8:

420 mm

11

 

300 mm

16

Note : Chart is nonlinear with evenly spaced f/number progression;
ASA 100 @ 1/4 power (close two stops for full power, one stop for each ASA doubling)


When you use the above tables, note that extension factor has already been taken into account, and the f/ stop indicated is as it should be set on the lens. The "chart is (non)linear" notation indicates whether if, the data, when scatter-plotted with distance on the y-axis and f/ stop progression (i.e. f/1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, etc.) spaced evenly on the x-axis, are linear or not. The linear ones may be linearly interpolated, using the logarithm of the f/ stop.


SR-1 Ringlight

As with all ringlights, this unit is designed to provide shadowless lighting for close-up subjects. It attaches to the front of the lens via a 52mm threaded ring, which may be turned via the knurled ring in the center of the flashtube housing. A cord is permanently attached to this unit. The cord has two plugs on it; one is a standard PC-type sync plug and the other is the 4-pin power plug, which attaches to the SB-1 only. Thus for those of you who've scrounged up a spare SD-3 can't use the SR-1 (or SM-1) with the SB-1 and SD-3. The SR-1's power is controlled via the SB-1's power switch, and the SR-1 has a light-output switch which cuts the output from full to 1/4 power.

The SR-1 is recommended for use for subject-to-film-plane distances greater than 200mm. The guide number appears to be 14m (45.5ft) at ASA 100 and full power. 1/4 power would require opening up two more stops. Since the SB-1/SR-1 is a fully manual flash, without exposure confirmation, your best bet is either to obtain and use a flashmeter, or use the guide number calculated above. A chart is included below for your convenience:

subject-fp f/distance

stop

625 mm

5.6

500 mm

8

375 mm

11

250 mm

16

130 mm

22


Note : Chart is nonlinear with evenly spaced f/number progression;
ASA 100 @ 1/4 power (close two stops for full power, one stop for each ASA doubling)

There's not much else to say. If you're a fan of flat, featureless lighting, or have a burning need for a ringlight, you could probably do better than an SR-1. More modern units will provide TTL flash metering, which is a godsend for close-up photography. On the other hand, if you want to assemble the complete SB-1 system ...


SM-2 Ringlight

RingFlash SRSM2.jpg (12k)
Light Output Control:
manual; full or 1/4 power
Guide Number:
not applicable
Number of Flashes (appox.):
600 (LD-1, full, alkaline manganese batteries)
1 400 (LD-1, 1/4, alkaline manganese batteries)
unlimited (LA-1)
Recycling Time:
appox. 12 sec.
Angle of Coverage:
sufficient for macro coverage
Power Sources:
LD-1 DC unit (8 1.5V "D"-type cells)
LA-1 AC unit
Ready-light:
provided
Open Flash/Test Firing Button:
provided
Modeling Lamp:
provided; button-activated
Synch Socket for Eyepiece Pilot Lamp:
provided
Ready-light Contact for F2 Series Camera Finders:
provided with accessory SC-4
Dimensions and Weight:
70 x 100 x 35mm; 185g without batteries
2.8 x 3.9 x 1.4 in.; 6.5 oz. without batteries
Accessories:
DC Unit LD-1
AC Unit LA-1
ready-light adapter SC-4
sync cord SC-5
coiled sync cord SC-6
sync cord SC-7
extension cord SE-2
eyepiece pilot lamp SF-1

Visually, the SM-2 appears nearly identical to its predecessor, the SM-1. The main differences are that the SM-2 has sockets instead of the SM-1's permanently attached power and sync cords. The sockets on the SM-2 are similar to other Nikon speedlites; there is the three-prong sync socket and a half-moon three-pin power socket identical to the one on the later version of the Medical-Nikkor 200 (not wholly unexpected, as they share the same power supplies ...)

Although I am not completely sure, the specs and usage for the SM-2 should be the same as those for the SM-1. The great advantage of using the SR-2/SM-2 (instead of the the corresponding SR-1/SM-1 products) is in not being tied to the SB-1 as a source of power, but rather being tied to largish, blocky power packs. Yes, there's always the SB-21A/B, which offers TTL closeup flash at a price.


SR-2 RinglightSetup.jpg (12k)

Light Output Control:
manual; full or 1/4 power
Guide Number:
16m (52 ft.) for ASA 100 film at full power
8m (26 ft.) for ASA 100 film at 1/4 power
Number of Flashes (appox.):
600 (LD-1, full, alkaline manganese batteries)
1 400 (LD-1, 1/4, alkaline manganese batteries)
unlimited (LA-1)
Recycling Time:
appox. 12 sec.
Angle of Coverage:
65 degrees
Power Sources:
LD-1 DC unit (8 1.5V "D"-type cells)
LA-1 AC unit
Ready-light:
provided
Open Flash/Test Firing Button:
provided
Synch Socket for Eyepiece Pilot Lamp:
provided
Ready-light Contact for F2 Series Camera Finders:
provided with accessory SC-4
Dimensions and Weight:
140 x 106 x 25mm; 200g without batteries
5.5 x 4.2 x 1 in.; 7 oz. without batteries
Accessories:
DC Unit LD-1
AC Unit LA-1
ready-light adapter SC-4
sync cord SC-5
coiled sync cord SC-6
sync cord SC-7
extension cord SE-2
eyepiece pilot lamp SF-1

Visually, the SR-2 appears nearly identical to its predecessor, the SR-1. The main differences are that the SM-2 has sockets instead of the SR-1's permanently attached power and sync cords. The sockets on the SR-2 are similar to other Nikon speedlites; there is the three-prong sync socket and a half-moon three-pin power socket identical to the one on the later version of the Medical-Nikkor 200 (not wholly unexpected, as they share the same power supplies ...)

Although I am not completely sure, the specs and usage for the SR-2 should be the same as those for the SR-1. Again, remember that the SR-2 is appropriate for use down to 0.6m (2 ft.).

| Back | to Index Page of Flash for Nikon F & F2

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Nikon Flash Units: BC-Series| Original Nikon Speedlight
SB-2 | SB-3 | SB-4 | SB-5 | SB-6 | SB-7E | SB-8E | SB-9 | SB-E | SB-10
SB-11
| SB-12 | SB-14 | SB-140 UV-IR| SB-15 | SB16A | SB-17 | SB-18, SB-19 | SR2/SM-2 Ringlights | SB-21A (SB-29) Macro flash | Flash Accesories | SF-1 Pilot Lamp

Nikon AF-TTL Speedlights | SB-20 | SB-22 | SB-23 | SB-24 | SB-25 | SB-26 | SB-27 | SB-28 | Nikon SB-29(s) | Nikon SB-30 | Nikon SB-600 | Nikon SB-800 (updated)
Nikon AF-TTL Speedlight DX-Series:
Nikon SB-28DX | SB-50DX | SB-80DX (updated)

   
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Index Page
  Special Application lenses:
Micro-Nikkor Lenses - 50mm~55mm -60mm 85mm -105mm 200mm Micro-Zoom 70-180mm
Perspective Control (PC) - 28mm 35mm PC-Micro 85mm
Dedicated Lenses for Nikon F3AF: AF 80mm f/2.8 | AF 200mm f/3.5 EDIF
Depth of Field Control (DC): 105mm 135mm
Medical Nikkor: 120mm 200mm
Reflex-Nikkor Lenses - 500mm 1000mm 2000mm
Others: Noct Nikkor | OP-Nikkor | UV Nikkor 55mm 105mm | Focusing Units | Bellows-Nikkor 105mm 135mm
Nikon Series E Lenses: 28mm35mm50mm100mm135mm | E-Series Zoom lenses: 36~72mm75~150mm70~210mm


MF Zoom-Nikkor Lenses: 25~50mm | 28~45mm | 28~50mm | 28~85mm | 35~70mm | 36~72mm E | 35~85mm | 35~105mm | 35~135mm | 35~200mm | 43~86mm | 50~135mm | 50~300mm | 70~210mm E | 75~150mm E | 80~200mm | 85~250mm | 100~300mm | 180~600mm | 200~400mm | 200~600mm | 360~1200mm | 1200~1700mm

Tele-Converters: TC-1 | TC-2 | TC-200 | TC-201 | TC-300 | TC-301 | TC-14 | TC-14A | TC-14B | TC-14C | TC-14E | TC-16 | TC-16A | TC-20E

Recommended links to understand more technical details related to the Nikkor F-mount and production Serial Number:
http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm by: Hansen, Lars Holst
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html

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Copyright © 1998. Michael C. Liu ®

Site rearranged by: leofoo ®. Credit: Hiura Shinsaku® from Nikomat Club of Japan for feeding some useful inputs on the introductory page. The great 3D logo by Kiasu; Ted Wengelaar®, Holland for his continuous flow of input of early Nikon bodies. Stephen Gandy's Cameraquest; Marc Vorgers from Holland for his additinal images on Nikon F Apollo; Hayao Tanabe corrected my Red Dot and Early F assertions. Gray Levett, Grays of Westminster publishes an excellent monthly historical look at Nikon products, from where I learned about the high-speed F's. Made with a PowerMac, broadcast with a Redhat Linux powered server.

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