Additional information on

Nikon (Nippon Kogaku K.K.) RF W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5)
wideangle lens for Nikon S-Mount Rangefinder cameras


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The Nikkor 28mm focal length with the bayonet S-mount was introduced in September, 1952. It had brought a new dimension for rangefinding photography because prior to its release, the only wideangle for the Nikon S-series bodies was limiting to 35mm focal length. In fact, even after the reflex Nikon was introduced and stretched until the late '70, fixed focal length 35mm lenses were still being widely regarded as a "standard wideangle" for 35mm photography. So, picture angle wider than 35mm was considered "really wide" durig those days. However, the 2.8cm RF Nikkor was very well received in the market after its debut, primarily because of its practical element in delivering wider picture coverage as well as a more forgiving depth of field control as a native wideangle. Although the maximum aperture of f/3.5 was considered as quite slow; but gradually, news/reportage photographers, photojournalists and even the general public were slowing accepting the 28mm focal length Nikkor as a very practical lens for a wide varieties of photography. Further, during those days, the photographic world was still black & white dominated and one can still use dark room technique to compensate for its slight lack of lens speed. Probably, as Robert Rotoloni has pointed out in one of his publication, the popularity of this Nikon RF wideangle was partly due to it was cheaper priced than a comparing RF Nikkor 5cm f/1.4 standard lens, the claim may has a more realistic basis along with other reasons mentioned earlier. Another major reason I think was probably due to competition, Canon had produced a S-mount Serenar 28mm f/3.5 in October, 1951 - it was the fastest 28mm wideangle during that time, making the likes of Leitz's f/6.3 and Zeiss's f/8.0 pale in comparison in lens speed and usability. So, in a way, both the Japanese manufacturers were competing with each other to capture market share predominated by Leica and Contax earlier in the wideangle segment.
 
NOTE:- Leica first introduced their true wideangle, Leitz Hektor 2.8cm f/6.3 (1935~1955) to counter Contax's Carl Zeiss Jena 2.8cm f/8.0 Tessar (far left picture). In 1955, Leica replaced the 2.8cm Hektor with a Leitz Summaron 28mm f/5.6 with improved maximum aperture from f/6.3. You may notice all the early versions were slow lenses. The more modern version of the Elmarit 28mm f/2.8 was only being introduced quite late in 1965. I am not so good at Leica/Contax gears but I think prior to Leica M4P (1981) none of the Leica bodies had a built in bright-line frame for 28mm focal length. Canon 1951 attempt with the Serenar 28mm f/3.5 was shown below - it was used to be the world's fastest 28mm wideangle lens at the time of its introduction. Also please note the Canon 28mm Senerar lens was termed as "ULTRA-WIDEANGLE" (refer to the lens case at far right picture) which gives a clue on the state of wideangle lens development during that period. You can check Peter Kitchingman site for more info on the Canon RF lens group.

Carl Zeiss Jena 2.8cm f/8.0 (28mm f/8.0) by Camera$@EBAY.com Leica Leitz Hektor f=2.8cm 1:6.3 (28mm f/6.3) wideangle lens for rangefinder cameras Leica Leitz Summaron f=2.8cm 1:5.6 (28mm f/5.6) wideangle lens for rangefinder cameras
Credit:- The Zeiss 2.8cm f/8.0 above courtesy of Camera$@EBAY® which is my personal favorite EBAY STORE. Both the lovely shots of the Leica's Leitz Hektor 2.8cm f/6.3 and Summaron 2.8cm f/5.6 shown above courtesy of TheClassicCamera, UK. The picture of the RF Canon 2.8cm f/3.5 (far right) with Canon original / leather case dedicated Optical Finder courtesy of Mr. Brian Edwards who also has also a personal Portfolio on his own. All images displayed herein belonged to the respective contributors / Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

LInk to Carl Zeiss 2.8cm f/8 Image Library LInk to Carl Zeiss 2.8cm f/8 Image Library LInk to Canon 28mm f/3.5 SENENAR - Image Library LInk to Canon 28mm f/3.5 SENENAR - Image Library

LInk to Angenieux 28mm f/3.5  in Leica Thread

An interesting Leica thread Angenieux's in retrofocus design 1950~60

Contax's Carl Zeiss Jena 2.8cm f/8.0 Tessar RF

Canon Serenar 28mm f/3.5

Canon RF 28mm f/3.5

Angenieux 28mm f/3.5 wideangle lens


Basic information on Nippon Kogaku K.K. W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) M39 Screw-Mount (SM*) wideangle lens
Introduced: August, 1953; Discontinued: No info

There were actually two versions of the RF Nikkor 2.8cm f/3.5. After Canon's Serenar 2.8cm f/3.5 Mk I was released (Picture at top right); citing the Serenar successful debut, Nikon had followed the path with a Leica M39 Screw Mount version in order to capture market share from the German made labels which lacked a countering measure for a 28mm wideangle lens with practical lens speed. It was not known whether the SM version was introduced earlier than Nikon S-mount version or not but according to Peter Braczko's Nikon handbook, he had suggested the SM version was beginning to appear in Nikkor lens catalogue back in 1952. As Nikon own S-mount version was also being introduced in Sept. 1952 but I don't think it is important to pick on the exact date of release. But a more interesting feature is, the SM Nikkor RF version had some slightly different appearance from the eventual Nikon RF release. However, optically all versions available in the 2.8cm RF Nikkor were believed to have been sharing the same optical formula which is 6 elements in 4 groups design*.

* Ref:- NIkon stated "... the 2.8cm lens was based on the Ortho-NIKKOR 18 cm f/4.5 with 6-element construction for 18 x 13 cm format aerial camera, which had superb resolving power and little distortion, converted to a lens for 135 format with further improvement of aberrations and attained maximum aperture of f/3.5...."- Nikon Japan. I am not good at larger format lenses than 135mm and it acted as a reference only.

Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens in Leica screw mount (SM) Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens in Leica screw mount (SM) in another angle/view
Credit: Image courtesy of Broklyn Camera Exchange@EBAY®. The Company also operates an active Ebay Store. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.

Firstly, the SM version of the RF W.Nikkor 2.8cm f/3.5 was supplied only in all chrome finish. A distinctive difference between the SM/S-mount was the distance scales marked on the SM version was printed on the external ring (the largest rotating ring closest to the camera body). The version shown above has a higher serial number with 7148XX but P.Braczko hand book's showcased a photo of SM version which has a smaller starting S/N from 3447xxx. (whereas since BOTH marked with "W-Nikkor.C", so I would assume all series of this 2.8cm SM lenses were coated). However, it was rather confusing, as comparing data presented from R.Rotoloni's Hand Book copy, the S/N may have duplicated along with the S-mount. Anyway, I am not a historian, but there are probably around 10,000 of these lenses had been produced in a combined manner (SM/Bayonet)-mount, and I am trying just trying to close down on small things that had puzzled me. Anyway, Nikon had traditionally treated their "numbers' quite confidently, probably anyone of you be able to rectify/clarify these gray area be able to forward your knowledge and allow me to recompile the data source that I had presented here.

Chrome on brass version of the Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens in Leica screw mount (SM) with original lens cap
Credit: Image courtesy of Broklyn Camera Exchange@EBAY®. The Company also operates an active Ebay Store where he often lists many used RARE pieces of Nikon, Leica and other oldies. Brooklyn Camera Exchange, 1980 Broadcast Plaza, Merrick, NY 11566, Phone: 516-379-1260 / Fax 516-379-1268 e-mail: brooklyncam (AT) worldnet.att.net. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.


In fact, the SM version of the RF W-Nikkor 2.8cm was quite scarce in numbers as compared to Nikon bayonet-Mount version. To differentiate between the two, most noticeably is a focusing setting knob on the SM version that couples to the distance scale ring. The minimum focusing distance offered in the SM model is approx. 3.3 ft (approx. 1m). The filter thread is slightly larger at 34.5mm. The minimum aperture provides a useful f/22 which is good to allow photographers with a wider range of depth of field control. Despite being a moderate wideangle lens, it has better native characteristic in this area (DOF). On the positive side, the lens has an excellent display of depth of field scales marked around the index. An Infra index (R) is available for infra-photo enthuasists. As most of the cameras in the market during that era had no built-in frame line in the rangefinder for task such as photo composition, I think the Optical Finder designed specifically for the Nikon bayonet-mount version in interchangeable with the SM version. Well, an alternate mean is using a Leica made* or 3rd party label Finder(s). * Leica Model SUOOQ Folding Type Finder also covers 28mm; (also check the Leitz 2.8cm Summaron section for another vesion of finder) alternate SL00Z/12007 was introduced quite late in 1960, but most of the RF cameras by then had offered built-in frame lines. Neither any of the early version of the Vari-Frame/Focal Finders available during that time had provision for a 28mm wideangle lens.

Rear section view on  a Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens in Leica screw mount (SM) The SM Leica M39 Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens
Credit: Images displayed herein courtesy of Broklyn Camera Exchange @EBAY®. The Company also operates an active Ebay Store . Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.


Nikon (Nippon Kogaku K.K.) W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) Bayonet S-Mount wideangle lens
Introduced: June, 1953; Discontinued: probably around 1964/5#

Nikon rangefinder 28mm wideangle  by Ritz camera
As mentioned earlier, the RF W.Nikkor 1:3.5 f=2.8cm ultrawide was among the fastest wideangle available for the rangefinder market during that time. It was also Nikon's second wideangle lens. It has a almost similar physical appearance such as the W.Nikkor 2.5cm f/4.0 (In fact, shares the same as well as with series of f/2.5 and f/3.5 at the 35mm focal length) but it is less troublesome and confusing to set and use the lens during shooting as compared to the 2.5cm RF Nikkor. In the recessed front section around the exposed front lens element, you will find the imprinted aperture scales/lens data . Somehow, the SM version is more friendly with its the design where the aperture scales are located on top of the lens barrel/ring, it is very much like a modern manual focus Nikkor design. Within the bayonet mount versions, the early series produced has a chrome on brass outfit. And among the chrome/brass series, there are two models - one with a wider diaphragm scales and another with a narrower scales (printed above, near the exposed front lens element, refer to the second rows of the pictures below).

Credit: Image of the chrome version of W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens courtesy of Collectible Cameras®. The company is more well known as another popular RITZ Camera it has a huge inventry for many used collectible equipment of major camera labels. Image copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

# Nikon stated date in their official web site. Other sources: Both Nikon RF illustrated History / Nikon Hand Book suggested 09.1952

Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount all chrome on brass version Side section view of a typical old, Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount all chrome on brass version
Early chrome on brass Series.

Credit: Image at the left courtesy of Mr. Kelvin from his popular gokelvincameras @ Ebay Store . Image Copyright © 2003. All rights reserved.
The front view with various lens data and depth of field scales in compressed scales format on a Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount all chrome on brass version The higher serial number of with widening  depth of field scales format on a Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount
Notice the difference in extended width/length of the printed / lined Depth of Field (DOF) Scales and the serial numbers?

Credit: Image at the left courtesy of Mr. Kelvin Li from his popular gokelvincameras @ Ebay Store which retails for many hard-to-find Nikon, canon, Contax oldies. Image Copyright © 2003. All rights reserved.
The late version that has a higher serial number with widen depth of field scales printed possibly can be regarded as slight improvement over earlier model which was a little harder to read decreasing scales sandwitched together. There were no indications from any source in relation to the change which involved other optical changes within the optical structure between the two. The chrome version is a high quality lens with very well made materials. Compact and highly portable, it feels solid in the hand and when mounted onto a Nikon, it is just protruding slightly outward from the camera body. As compare to the previously featured 2.5cm Nikkor, lens handling has greatly improved with relevant lens feature properly located and easily adjustable.
Nikon rangefinder RF 28mm f/3.5 wideangle lens by Ritz camera Nikon rangefinder RF 28mm f/3.5 wideangle lens by Ritz camera with lens data and distance, infra index
Credit: Image(s) courtesy of Collectible Cameras®. The company is more well known as another popular RITZ Camera it has a huge inventry for many used collectible equipment of major camera labels. Image copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.
COMPARING both the black and chrome version of the W.Nikkor-C 2.8cm f/3.5 (28mm f/3.5) RF rangefinder wideangle lens
The black version of the W-Nikkor 2.8cm f/3.5 also was released after 1956 (S/N 71400+ onwards. The pictures shown below came with a dedicated metal lens hood for the 2.8cm lens as well. Except for the focusing and stationery DOF scales on the barrel, the black version has a lighter weight in comparison to the chrome version. However, the lens mounting ring and main lens tube was still a solid and rigid bright chrome type. NOTE: Black version was released in July, 1956. Barrel was changed from chrom/brass to lighter black alloy metal type.
A black version of the W.Nikkor-C 2.8cm f/3.5 (28mm f/3.5) RF rangefinder wideangle lens with dedicated lens hood attached. RF Nikkor-W 2.8cm f/3.5 with dedicated lens hood in chrome and black

A Black version of  Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount  A Black version of  Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount  mounted on a Nikon rangefinder camera
Credit: Images of the black version of W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens courtesy of Mr. J Emmerson from emostuff@EBAY®. Alessio also operates an active EBAY STORE where he often lists many used collectible equipment of major camera labels. Image copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.


Nikon's optical design / construction used in the 2.8cm f/3.5 RF  Nikkor-w ultra-wideangle lens for older series of Nikon Rangefinder cameras
The RF W-Nikkor 2.8cm wideangle lens was officially launched in 1952 - that was approx. a year after the 24mm x 34mm format's Nikon S was released. The main issue was not the odd film format on the camera but rather the inconvenience for in-finder photo composition because even after the Nikon S2 was launched 2 years later in 1954 (where the model was the first RF Nikon that truly conform to 24 x 36mm standard film format), none of the prevailing Nikon RF bodies were equipped with a built-in frame line inside the rangefinder.

* Optical design for the RF W-Nikkor.C 2.8cm f/3.5 wideangle lens for Nikon rangefinder cameras. Unless there are new information which was not known previously, it is acceptable to conclude the optical train used can be applied to all available variations.

Which means to say, the lens requires a separate Optical Finder to aid photo composition. Well, it was not until 5 years later that the pro-calibre Nikon SP (1957) that eventually a RF Nikon finally was designed with a built in bright-line frame for in-finder focusing / photo composition which eliminating the need to hook an external finder for such purpose. Similarly, even the SM version of the RF 2.8cm f/3.5 was having the problem on Leica where you need assistance from a separate Optical Finder. Just as the 2.5cm and 2.1cm RF wideangle counterparts, Nikon had also produced a dedicated finder accessory for the lens prior to release of the Nikon SP in 1956 (scroll down below for some pictures of the Nikon made 2.8cm Finder). As for the SM models you should refer to the suggested matching finder(s) mentioned earlier in this site or simply CLICK HERE for two lovely photos of the Leica version Folding Finders (I am not sure the Carl Zeiss Jena version of the Turret 440 Finder will fit the SM version as it has a provision for 2.8cm focal length). Please Also take Note: Similar to Nikon SP with built-in 28mm bright-line frame inside the viewfinder, from Leica M4P onwards, the 28mm bright frameline was built-in.

The Optical Finder for 28mm f/3.5 Rangefinder (RF) version with original leather  case

Front view of Nikon dedicated Optical Finder for 2.8cm f/3.5 rangefinder (RF) wideangle lens
The Optical Finder for the W.Nikkor 2.8cm f/3.5, was properly released in June, 1954. It was supplied in an all chrome tupe only. No known black version existed so far (correct me if I am wrong). It has feet or metres & a helical wheel for fine tuning for parallax correction. For owners of Variframe Zoom Finder, Nikon had a matching accessory which mounts to show the 28mm bright-line frame (2nd picture from the top).

Note:- Also compare Nikon's Finder with Canon version.

<<<--- Credit: All images (lens hood, Optical Finder and rear/side views below) herein courtesy of Mr. Kelvin gokelvincameras@Ebay Store All images Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved.

2.8cm (28mm) attachment on Nikon RF Variframe or variFocal zoom finder

Rear view of Nikon dedicated Optical Finder for 2.8cm f/3.5 rangefinder (RF) wideangle lens witn Nippon Kogaku name
Top view of Nikon dedicated Optical Finder for 2.8cm f/3.5 rangefinder (RF) wideangle lens with 2.8 marking base section view of Nikon dedicated Optical Finder for 2.8cm f/3.5 rangefinder (RF) wideangle lens Side  view (left) of Nikon dedicated Optical Finder for 2.8cm f/3.5 rangefinder (RF) wideangle lens Front view (right) of Nikon dedicated Optical Finder for 2.8cm f/3.5 rangefinder (RF) wideangle lens

Nikon rangefinder chrome 2.8cm zoom attachment for the variofocal viewfinder.
Here is a rare Nikon rangefinder chrome 2.8cm zoom attachment for the variofocal viewfinder. This is a slip-on attachment which allows the variofocal zoom finder to be used with a 28mm lens. Hard to find as they were frequently mis-identified in the used equipment market. Credit: Image(s) displayed here are courtesy of CamRon8888@Ebay® where his EBAY STORE often list many hardto find used photographic equipment.

Leica Optical Finder for 2.8cm Rangefinder wideangle lens by Alessio Nardelli from http://stores.ebay.com/Vini-Enogaia Leica E. Leitz Wetziar Optical Finder SUOOQ for 2.8cm Rangefinder wideangle lens by Alessio Nardelli from http://stores.ebay.com/Vini-Enogaia
Two lovely photos on a folding-type Leica SUOOQ Optical Finder. * Also check: Zeiss Jena 440 Turret which has a 2.8cm provision. You may also compre the Carl Zeiss finder types. Here is the Canon brightline frame type

Credit: Image courtesy of Mr. Alessio Nardelli from VINI ENOGAOA@EBAY®. He also operates an active EBAY STORE where he often lists many used RARE pieces of Nikon, Leica and other oldies. Image copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Naturally, use of a separate optical finder was via depth of field /distance estimation method (This lens is almost similar to the 2.1cm where accurate focusing is not essential at normal shooting distances as long as it is within DOF range. So, use depth of field scale cleverly should yield adequate range of sharp focus zone for photography). Well, as none of the original older series of RF Nikon camera models provide TTL metering and thus, user may has to make use incident light meter or ... old sunny 16 rules for estimating metering. Nikon did produced an own labeled exposure meter. However not all RF Nikon can use that SP-dedicated Exposure Meter as it was only being introduced to serve the Nikon SP mainly due to the fact that the 1957 pro-calibre Nikon SP was the first RF Nikon body among the RF S-series that followed which offered a non rotating shutter speed dial** hence enables the exposure meter be coupled onto the camera. ** Note: Amog others, the first non-rotating shutter dial RF Canon was the Canon VI-L in 1958.

Other views of the RF Nikkor wideangle lens:-
The recessed front exposed lens element of W-Nikkor 2.8cm f/3.5 RF wideangle lens Rear section with a larger sized lens element of W-Nikkor 2.8cm f/3.5 RF wideangle lens An interesting marked

The recessed front exposed lens element

Rear section with a larger sized lens element

An interesting marked "EP"* on the early all-chrome version.

Credit: All images (lens hood, Optical Finder and rear/side views above) herein courtesy of Mr. Kelvin from his popular gokelvincameras@Ebay Store which retails for many hard-to-find Nikon, canon, Contax oldies. All images Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved.

* NOTE:- An "EP" marked item was just to differentiate mechandize / goods that sold during the post war Japan era. EP engraved items were distributed via military "duty-free" outlets or sometimes referred as PX distribution system during the period. Technically, you can refer them as the same with "MIOJ" (Made in Occupied Japan) products.

Nikon SP's viewfinder / rangefinder for 28mm wideangle and parallax compensation for 35mm RF lenses
A note using the 2.8cm with the Nikon SP: The Nikon SP was the first rangefinder Nikon that has been designed with a built-in bright-line frame for 28mm which eliminates the use of external optical finder. The left hand section of the eyepiece is the viewfinder for the 28mm and 35mm lenses in a SP. The full frame indicates the viewing field for the 28mm wideangle lens; the inner frame with a solid black frame is meant for the 35mm RF lenses. The dotted indicative line inside the smaller 35mm frame is the parallax compensation for the 35mm when using for viewing when the subject in closer than 4 feet. No parallax compensation is required for the wider 28mm as the wider angle of coverage. For indicative bright-lines frame for other focal lengths when mounted on a Nikon SP | CLICK HERE | for more info.

Just like any prime 28mm wideangle lenses, RF W-Nikkor 1:3.5 f=2.8cm has a very useful and practical aspect for photography. Although in general, reflex photography provides a more responsive, as well as sheer convenience in focusing accuracy and direct TTL system in comparison to rangefinder system, but most rangefinder system lovers would prefer the old ways in an all quiet operating/shooting sequence on the field. As compare to the likes of the 2.1cm and 2.5cm which could easily raise the blood flow for any Nikon collectors, this RF Nikkor 2.8cm lens may not shine in its exotic, scarce existence as collectible but had truly served its purpose as a high quality Nikkor rangefinder imaging tool during its entire life cycle for rangefinder photography. So, I guess rather than solely valued it from the narrow perspective of antique camera/lens collecting, this lens also had its native objective as a photographic lens for your RF Nikon. Along with the emerging popularity of the reflex photographt after the Nikon F was introduced, this rangefinder wideangle Nikkor wideangle lens has been slowly diminishing from active limelight. Here in this site, we are just dedicating another page here in MIR to chronicle another old Nikkor classic wideangle. Enjoy.

Nikon / Nippon Kogaku KK RF Nikkor rangefinder lens front, rear and accessories
Credit: Image(s) courtesy of Mr. Peter Coeln from LEICA Shop®, Austria who also operates a popular Westlicht Auction House. Image Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.



Basic Specification for Nikon (Nippon Kogaku K.K.) RF W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) rangefinder wideangle lens:-

Lens Mount: Nikon S-mount for RF Nikon or M39 Screw Mount
Focal Length: 28mm (2.8cm); Picture Angle: 74
° (45° x 64° ); Maximum / Minimum Aperture: f/3.5 ~ f/22

A black version of the W.Nikkor-C 2.8cm f/3.5 (28mm f/3.5) RF rangefinder wideangle lens with dedicated lens hood attached.

Optical Construction: 6 elements in 4 groups; Orthometar-Type
Minimum Focusing Distance: 90cm (approx. 3 ft) ~
OO
Filter Attachment Size: Series VII (43mm) screw-in Type;
Lens Hood: 43mm Screw-in Type; Diaphragm: Manual
Dimension:-
55.8 mm dia. x 32.4 mm long (overall)
Weight (body only)
: approx. 145g for Chrome version; 100g (Black); Screw Mount (Leica Thread):- No info

Standard Accessories
: Optical Finder (2.8cm model); special rear lens cap. Screw-in type lens cap; Optional: Lens hood 43mm, optical filters Series VII for S-Mount; Series VI for Leica SM etc.

Other Information
: Single coated only. Early Leica thread M39 Screw mount version in chrome finish only or S-Mount for Nikon RF models. Special combined 43mm lens hood/filter adapter or 43mm direct snap on/screw in type. Serial Numbering used:- Chrome/Brass S-Mount starts from 346000 ~ 349000. Higher series S/N from 71200~714000. No info on the Lighter weight black version but the model used here in this site has 714xxxx. Total Units (Combined):- Approx. 10,000 Units. Ref: Robert Rotoloni's An Illustrated History on Nikon Rangefinder camera.

A Black and chrome version of the lens hood for  Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount  A Black and chrome version of the lens hood for  Nikon W-Nikkor-C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm (28mm f/3.5) wideangle lens in Nikon Bayonet S-Mount  base view
In relation to the lens hood for the 2.8cm f/3.5 RF Nikkor wideangle lens:- "... the chrome lens hood came with the blue box, the black hood has no box, but it would be the yellow one if it had one....". -Jim- Credit: Images of the black version of W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens courtesy of Mr. J Emmerson from emostuff@EBAY®. Alessio also operates an active EBAY STORE where he often lists many used collectible equipment of major camera labels. Image copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Nippon Kogaku / Nikon rangefinder - optical finder for 2.8cm W.Nikkor.C f/3.5 wideangle lens Depth of Field tables for W.Nikkor 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens
<<<--- Depth of Field tables (148k Jpeg) for W.Nikkor 1:3.5 f=2.8cm wideangle lens

Recommended External Web Resources on this 2.8cm f/3.5 RF W.Nikkor:- A very well compiled data base in this German Site (Taunusreiter.DE) Discussion Forum at Nikon Historical Society (NHS) Discussion Forum; and Rangefinder Forum. SP5-World, Japan - excellent source on many RF Nikon/Nikkor (Japanese/English); Seeking used Rangefinder Nikkor lenses @ EBAY Search on RF Nikko lenses. NOTE:- Many Contributors of photos/pictures appeared in this site are Nikon/Nikkor oldies specialists, please refer to their respective links to look for goodies.



Non Ai version of the reflex version Nikon 28mm f/3.5 wideangle lens
RELATIVE:- HHow the original RF Nikkor lens evolved itself within the Nikkor 28mm lens group after the Reflex Nikon F was officially announced in 1959:-

Nikon's first 28mm in the F-mount was introduced in 1960. The
Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=28mm was an non Ai lens and it had gone through some changes until the Nikkor-H.C 1:3.5 f=28mm was introduced. The first Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 with a modern feel was released in 1975 as a pre-Ai version where the Ai version was introduced in 1977. It followed with an Ai-S version in 1981. In between, the MF Nikkor 28mm f/2.8 with a faster lens speed was introduced in 1974/5 as a Pre-Ai spec Nikkor wideangle lens. The same lens was converted as Ai in 1977 too. The 1981 revised version had an all new optical composition. Many believe it was one of the best spec Nikkor wideangle.The first autofocus version AF Nikkor 28mm f/2.8S was launched in 1986 - also had a revised optical design. The AF-D version again had gone through another round of redesigned optically in 1994 which stays as the current version (as at 2008). Another manual focus with a very fast lens speed was the Nikkor 28mm f/2.0 which was introduced in 1971 which followed by a Nikkor-N 28mm type in 1976. The Ai version was realized in 1977 along with an all Nikkor lens updating program. The last of the Nikkor 28mm f/2.0S (Ai-S) was released in 1981. It was the last of the batch and there was never a f/2.0 being revised in an autofocus outfit. Instead Nikon has chosen a moderate lens speed f/2.8. However, Nikon had surprised many by introducing a ultra fast f/1.4 maximum aperture for the autofocus Nikon in 1993. The AF Nikkor 28mm f/1.4D was delivered with a native AF-D spec. Nikon had eventually announced its discontinuation of this superlative autofocus wideangle lens in 2006 and concentrate on development of autofocus range of wideangle zoom lenses.

Canon  RF 28mm f/2.8 front view Canon  RF 28mm f/2.8 side view all chrome version Canon  RF 28mm f/2.8 rear lens mount view
SUPPLEMENTARY INFO:- It is also interesting to note that Canon also had quickly react to Nikon's release with an even faster lens speed original Serenar 28mm f/3.5 lens in 1952/3. The shown version at the left was changed as Canon. In fact, overall Canon seemingly had the larger varieties in terms of wideangles selection than Nikon. (see illustrations CLICK TO ENLARGED). AlsoI would recommend you to take a look at some fabulous pictures of Canon RF 28mm f/3.5 taken by Brian Edwards for this site as comparison. You can compare it with another very interesting Leica thread French Angenieux 28mm f/3.5 in retrofocus design.
Credit: All images of the Canon lens herein courtesy of Mr. kalogiros.ioannis where I spotted these lovely photos from his website http://photocam.ibelgique.com. All images Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved.

Comparison among:-
Leica/Leitz
Summaron 1:3.5 f=28mm
Canon
Serenar 2.8cm lenses
Contax Carl Zeiss Jena
Tessar 1:8 f=2.8cm (various)

W-Nikkor-O 1:4 f=2.1cm | W-Nikkor.C 1:4 f=2.5cm | W-Nikkor.C 1:3.5 f= 2.8cm | W-Nikkor.C 3.5cm lens Group (3.5/2.5/1.8) | Stereo-Nikkor 1:3.5 f=3.5cm | 5cm (50mm) lens group | RF Micro-Nikkor 1:3.5 f=5cm | Nikkor-P.C 1:2 f=8.5cm lens group / Nikkor-S.C 1:1.5 f=8.5cm lens group | Nikkor-P.C 1:2.5 f=10.5cm lens group / Nikkor-T 1:4 f=10.5cm | Nikkor-Q.C 13.5cm lens group: 135/4, 135/3.5 Early / Last Version, 135/4 Bellow lens | Nikkor-H 1:2.5 f=18cm | Nikkor-Q 1:4 f=25cm | Nikkor-T 1:4.5 f=35cm | Nikkor-T.C 1:5 f=50cm | Reflex-Nikkor 100cm f/6.3

System Accessories for Nikon Rangefinder cameras
Optical Finders (4 parts):-
Fixed Focal length Finders (index page): 2.1cm, 2.5cm, 2.8cm, 3.5cm, 35cm Stereo, 5cm, 8.5cm, 10.5cm, 13.5cm | Variframe / Varifocal / Sport-frames | Nikon Reflex Housing

Nikon S36/S72/S250 Motor Drives / S36 Manual | light meters | Nikon RF Flash/Speedlights | Close-up photography / Repro Copy Outfit / Nikon Bellow Focusing Device (in progress) | Cases/Compartments | Lens & body caps, Lens Hoods/shades, Original Price Lists | packaging/boxes

Instruction Manuals

Related info:- Main index page for Leica/Leitz | Contax/Carl Zeiss | Seiki Kogaku (Canon)

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Nikon
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Credit:- Special thanks to all the contributors of images and content which made up the basis of the site. Note:certain content and images appeared in this site were either scanned from official marketing leaflets, brochures, sales manuals or publications published by Nikon over the years and/or contribution from surfers who claimed originality of their work for educational purposes. The creator of the site will not be responsible for may discrepancies arise from such dispute except rectifying them after verification."Nikon", "Nikkormat", "Nippon Kokagu KK" & "Nikkor" are registered trade name of Nikon Corporation Inc., Japan. Site made with an Apple G5 IMac.